10 of the Strangest Programs Run by the NSA

10 of the Strangest Programs Run by the NSA


Before Edward Snowden revealed us an unprecedented
amount of the National Security Agency’s activities in 2013, most of us were only vaguely
familiar with the shadowy organization and its information-gathering ways. The NSA has its tendrils in virtually every
digital aspect of our daily life, to the point that one of their automated information-collecting
programs is probably reading this right now (Hi!) and trying to figure out whether we’re
a threat to national security (We really aren’t!). While reports of their current activities
are understandably few and far between, thanks to Mr. Snowden and his leaked documents we
do have some insight into the things the NSA were up to in 2013 and before that … and
it’s not pretty. Here’s a look at some of the agency’s
strangest antics. Angry Birds No, it’s not just a fun code name, or, for
that matter, even a code name. It’s that Angry Birds. In 2014, the Guardian reported that the NSA,
along with its significantly less catchy British counterpart GCHQ, were looking into various
techniques where they can sneak all up the “leaks” of your favorite phone apps, up
to and very much including the world’s premier “Birds Vs. Pigs” game. The idea was to slip through the security
cracks of the apps in order to reach the users’ personal data, which would provide the agencies
with a number of significant advantages. They would gain access to a huge amount of
the kind of data that would allow them to exploit people’s phone information on a
mass scale, instead of just having to hack their way into our phones one by one like
some commoner. Location, as well: When you use Google Maps
to find a place, the NSA can use it to find you. The NSA seems to put great value on such technology,
to the point where one 2010 presentation called it a “Golden Nugget” before rattling off
a long list of information the agency could gather from just a single picture uploaded
on social media. Fortunately, this plan was among the documents
Edward Snowden leaked in 2013, so at least we’re aware that some of America’s taxpayer
dollars go towards surreptitiously scrolling through your contact lists as you play Candy
Crush or whatever. Boundless Informant Congress has occasionally challenged the NSA
about what they do with all the data they collect from American citizens. One of the agency’s go-to defenses has been
that they have no way of keeping track of the waves of information crashing on their
shores, but in 2013, it turned out that a secretive agency might, in fact, have been
lying about its methods. It’s shocking, we know. Boundless Informant is a highly sophisticated
datamining tool the NSA uses to analyze and record its surveillance information. It’s essentially a hyper-competent archivist
that sifts through the sea of data and arranges it to neat folders. However, it doesn’t appear to do it by user
— unless they decide to take a personal interest in you, Boundless Informant probably
doesn’t have a folder of your most embarrassing emails and IMs. Instead, the system sifts through the incoming
information by “counting and categorizing” the communications records metadata (sets
of data that describe other data). However, the level of detail it goes to even
includes individual IP addresses … which, as you may know, can totally be tracked down
to the countries they’re from. Dishfire SMS texting is slowly but steadily going the
way of the dodo as instant messaging platforms are taking over, but the NSA has been collecting
them like they were coming back in fashion. According to the 2013 data leak, the Dishfire
program performs a daily, global and supposedly untargeted sweep of SMS messages, and took
them to a second program called Prefer, which automatically analyzed them for assorted red
flags. The agency was head over heels about this
particular avenue of information collection, to the point where a 2011 presentation was
titled “SMS Text Messages: A Goldmine to Exploit.” They weren’t exactly wrong, either: automated
messages, international roaming charge texts, missed call alerts, electronic business cards
and text-to-text payments gave them access to unprecedentedly clear metadata in ridiculous
droves. To put the scale of the operations in context,
at the time of the leaks the NSA was able to collect over five million missed-call alerts
(for contact chaining analysis), Around 800,000 money transactions, 1.6 million border crossings,
over 110,000 names, 76,000 people’s real-time locations, and a total of nearly 200 million
SMS messages. Per day. Egoistical Goat and its friends The anonymous Tor network is obviously a bit
of a problem for an information-gathering entity like the NSA, but it appears the agency
had already made some progress to lift the veil of secrecy as early as in 2013. To crack down Tor’s information safe, the
agency created a number of programs with increasingly stupid names, all lovingly crafted to compromise
Tor user anonymity. There was Egoistical Goat and its sister programs
Egoistical Giraffe and Erroneous Identity, which tried to worm their way in the Firefox
parts of the Tor Bundles in order to identify users. Before them, the NSA had Mjoliner, which was
meant to divert Tor users to insecure channels, and a marking operation called Mullenize,
which was the online equivalent of a surveillance helicopter trying to shoot a tracking device
in a car before it drives in a hidden tunnel. Meanwhile, NSA’s British version, GCHQ,
did its level best to outdo its American counterpart’s ridiculous code names by trying to crack Tor
with operations called Epicfail and Onionbreath. Despite all their antics, the NSA’s success
rate at identifying Tor users was spotty at best — but really, who knows what they have
come up with since 2013? GILGAMESH It’s one thing for the NSA to want to know
about people’s information, and completely another to use that information to find out
your location and giving it to the Joint Security Operations Command in case they need to bomb
someone. This explosive application of NSA tracking
technology is called GILGAMESH, and it’s essentially what would happen if a bunch of
NSA’s geolocation tracking technologies married a Predator drone. Thanks to the vast array of online information
available to them, the NSA has taken to recommending drone targets with complex metadata analysis
instead of relying on human intelligence. However, the Intercept points out that while
the tactic has had some success it has by no means been particularly accurate and reliable. One drone pilot operating with NSA-dictated
targets has admitted it “absolutely” has resulted in innocent people getting killed. Optic Nerve To be fair, Optic Nerve was technically a
brainchild of the British GCHQ, but since they NSA happily assisted in it, we’ll let
it slide. It was a codename for a surveillance program
that surreptitiously collected a bunch of images from Yahoo’s webcam chats from all
over the world by the million, with little to no regard whether the people they were
collecting them from were persons of interest or not. This might be pretty creepy in and of itself,
but becomes doubly so when you remember the sort of stuff that tends to go on in webcam
chats. Yes, we’re talking about nudity, and judging
by the scale of the operation, there must have been plenty of it, too. In fact, leaked documents reveal that the
GCHQ actually had some trouble keeping all the naked pictures away from the interested
eyes of its employees, which in a way is even scarier than just stealing images in bulk. Understandably, Yahoo was less than thrilled
to find out about the situation, which they say happened only when the British media reached
out to ask some questions. The company called Optic Nerve a “whole
new level of violation of our users’ privacy,” and really, it’s hard to argue with them. PRISM PRISM is massive surveillance program that
started in 2007 and came into light when the Washington Post and the Guardian whipped out
a pile of leaked documents in 2013. Technically, PRISM was/is a system for monitoring
foreign communication passing through American servers. However, in practice, they monitored everything
they humanly could, and gathered their data from “providers” that you might be familiar
with. As of 2013, tiny little companies like Google,
Microsoft, Apple, Facebook, Yahoo, Skype and the like had to hand the NSA remarkable access to their servers, and
the vast buckets of data from their users that lays within. NSA can use this giant pool of information
to a terrifying accuracy, to the point where they could just directly access your — yes,
specifically your — information and spy on every little thing you do online. The only caveat is that some analyst in their
machinery has to vouch that they’re, like, 51% sure that you’re probably foreign, maybe. Upstream If you thought the NSA was happy just spying
what you do on the internet, worry not — there’s more to come. Upstream is basically the same deal as PRISM,
only with telecommunications companies such as Verizon and AT&T … and in a much more
classic “spying” capacity. Where PRISM relies on intangible tech shenanigans
of the “access to big company servers” variety, project Upstream has physically installed
a host of surveillance equipment to the internet’s physical “backbone”: the routers, cables
and other gear that carry all the online traffic. The NSA uses this infiltration to track down
specific keywords related to potential foreign intelligence activity, though even this noble-ish
intent is rendered moot by the fact that they also often target the media, legal attorneys
and human rights people instead of just supposed spies and suspected terrorists. The American Civil Rights Union has called
the practice “unprecedented and unlawful.” Bullrun What good is stealing data from countless
unwary people if you don’t know what to do with it? The NSA answered this question with codename
Bullrun, a state-of-the-art decryption program that can straight up decode the encryption
used by several prominent providers, which means they can read your emails with the greatest
of ease should the need arise. This powerful Sigint (signals intelligence)
weapon is built by stealthily working with large tech companies to install weaknesses
in their products, and then exploiting these openings with their own decryption tools. This way, the NSA and its British counterpart
GCHQ are able to browse through not only their targets’ emails, but banking accounts and
medical history as well. Essentially, if you have personal information
online, Bullrun can out how to decrypt it. Bullrun’s importance to the NSA can easily
be seen by looking at its budget: When Edward Snowden brought the system out in the open
in 2013, PRISM’s operating costs were around $20 million a year. Bullrun? Over $250 million. FASCIA The FASCIA database was among the more interesting
documents Edwards Snowden leaked. It was a massive collection of metadata, consisting
of all sorts of call information, IP addresses and suchlike. What made the project so impressive(ly scary)
was its sheer scale: Though the document dates back to January 2004, it said that FASCIA
II had over 85 billion metadata records, and an estimated 125 million were added on a daily
basis. Leaked graphs (like the one above) indicate
that the system has since evolved, and in 2012, FASCIA already received five billion
device-location records every day. There’s no telling what that number is now,
but smart money would probably say that it’s significantly larger. The NSA started getting hold of all this metadata
during the War on Terror by straight up forcing phone companies to hand it over to the agency. Originally, this data included pretty intimate
stuff, such as the numbers you called and the duration of said calls, though not the
actual content. In 2015, the process was slightly changed
so that the NSA could only collect bulk metadata and looking at an individual person’s records
would require a court order. Even so, the NSA has been known to call this
system one of their “most useful tools,” and they say it has even helped them capture
multiple terror suspects.

Daniel Ostrander

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100 thoughts on “10 of the Strangest Programs Run by the NSA

  1. FvckYoutube'sCensorship UseAdblock says:

    I hope Simon is just paying the contractual lip service and doesn't actually use Nord. Otherwise he's probably screwed with the rest of Nord's users. And just about every streaming site even remotely worth a crap (Netflix, Amazon, etc) that georestricts content blacklists all known VPN servers anyway and won't work with one, so a VPN is basically useless for that.

  2. Marissa Bones says:

    I would like a video on NordVPN

  3. Insite LifeTec says:

    TopTenz seems to be ignoring NordVPN's recent issues. With Youtube's upcoming constricting TOS coming soon, I guess they're just trying to hang on.

  4. otakuman706 says:

    Thumbs up, and now I'm on the short list for monitoring…

  5. NAVRET says:

    NSA – No Such Agency. 🤫

  6. Richard Kuhn says:

    REALLY ? Naa uh really ?

  7. CityinFlames says:

    I try to avoid leaving a internet impression to follow lol

  8. BonkedByAScout says:

    You guys should probably stop shilling NordVPN now.

  9. glenn T says:

    Simon is definitely a terrorist, he has a beard

  10. actuallyhamburgers says:

    why are you still advertising nordvpn after it's been shown they aren't secure with the recent hacking

  11. Badass Dragon says:

    Apparantly NSA has more interest in my life than i do

  12. Michael Burgess says:

    Note in the NORD ad one of their selling ponts is that the are not based in one of the bastions of freedom and democracy that are located in North America and Western Europe. No, they are based in a Central America "Banana Republic" to ensure you have privacy.

  13. Michael Burgess says:

    If this bothers you, don't watch "Terms and Conditions May Apply". It's getting a bit dated, but deals with many of the same issues in a long format. I particularly like the people on the No Fly List who used trigger words in perfectly innocent emails and on-line searches.

  14. vizionthing says:

    Thumbs down for the Nord VPN shilling

  15. Coffeyville Science Girl says:

    Don't use NordVPN. You're putting a lot of trust in an organizaton that has proven they don't deserve that level of trust.

  16. Robert Schlesinger says:

    These are but a sampling of the NSA's shenanigans. Years ago, the NSA would show up at high end mathematics and computer science conferences to survey the state-of-the-art in certain fields, particularly number theory, information theory, cryptography, machine learning, etc. They gave all sorts of gifts to entice prospective employees, even frisbees with the NSA logo on it, which they kindly gave two to me.

  17. BigMobe says:

    The tech companies and government spying is concerning, but whats even more concerning is that if they can do it than other people with far more malicious motives also can.

  18. Bryan Schafer says:

    This video gives the idea that the NSA had to do all this ‘hacking’ and doesn’t question that back door access was built into our hardware and software by the developers; why does Angry Birds need access to our camera and photos? It’s pretty clear that the developers of our technology give the data to intelligence agencies directly then give us a data breach story – this video is pure disinformation 😒

  19. Sound One213 says:

    In upstream, you mention american civil rights union but i think you mean the american civil liberties union (ACLU vs ACRU)

  20. D J says:

    Simon your the best

  21. Jim Schwartz says:

    "Well, I'm sure the NSA would adhere to court orders", said my suspicious neighbor.

  22. G A Pratt says:

    All the more reason to drop a money order in the mail.

  23. punkypink83 aka Emily says:

    oh dear kinda surprised that this channel is still running NordVPN ads. i know plenty other channels who pulled their ads and even reuploaded…

  24. acrefray says:

    And remember: There are still campaigns against Snowden, insisting he is a traitor, that he only did harm to the public, and all manner of evil things.

  25. Robert Jardine says:

    I literally started watching this video and my cell phone Drive page popped up on my screen twice and paused the video. Very strange considering the content of this video?

  26. Trevor Joseph O'Neill says:

    And knowone does anything about it so they keep doing it. I dont know what's worse, that they do it or that we allow them to do it

  27. Youcant Stopme! says:

    Are the NSA creeps?

  28. james riggs says:

    That was…interesting. I realize in this modern technological age privacy is virtually nonexistent,but after watching that it DEFINITELY is nonexistent. We need Snake Plisskin to activate the Sword of Damocles.

  29. Bruce Pulver says:

    Huawei got banned for what? Not sharing?!?!?!

  30. Lou Sensei says:

    Commenters so conditioned that they joke about this. Their plan is still working..😒

  31. F And says:

    Lol. Dude still advertising Nord VPN? Man, he really sold out

  32. John Stevenson says:

    "Internet privacy" is an oxymoron. Just figure that like unicorns, there's no such thing.

  33. Quinten Whyte says:

    Project Insight!

  34. Hiro Protaganist says:

    Uhh, NORD VPN was just in a major hacking scandal.

  35. Good Old Rodg says:

    Simon, Simon, Simon! The NSA is behind Russia, North Korea, China, UK, GOOGLE, Facebook, and everybody else. The idea that your personal data has ever been private is childish fantasy. You, I, everybody needs a protective government to have this.information. This is a non issue. Can't live in the modern world without it. Are you telling me you thought that your private data was ever "private"? Pshaw!

  36. Kevin HeyMan says:

    Me;
    "Do you ever feel your being watched?"

    NSA;
    "you're"

  37. Keith W says:

    Snowden sucks bollocks…and drinks rare Russian mountain oysters juice from the source….happy accident to find him in my scope crosshairs….💨

  38. Drunken Master says:

    Hey nice one shilling a compromised VPN as safe. Really amazing. Disliking every video until you cease.

  39. twocvbloke says:

    They probably have a warehouse full of jars filled with people's used underpants too, just like the East German Stazi pre-wall fall… 😛

  40. Debra Witte says:

    well yes, 1984 has come and gone…

  41. snipervictim says:

    OMG did somebody say Mexican or black guy or Muslim it is amazing the lengths white people will go to when they THINK they are in danger. Screw THEIR rights or privacy once spooked they will sell THEIR mothers down the river .

  42. Steve Hall says:

    The NSA will find my life mind numbingly boring, I do.

  43. Carlos Barroso Barroso says:

    didnt nord got hacked?

  44. Cmdr Benkai says:

    This vIdeo supported by the NSA

  45. Ryan StonedOnCanadianGaming says:

    0:40
    Have you seen the comment section Simon?

  46. Retardretroguy says:

    They don't seem to keep up national security when they scroll through you contacts like gay french king

    Hey, I made the almost funny!

  47. GoodFeller says:

    Might want to cut ties with Nord VPN

  48. Marc Lemieux says:

    Why should the US gov be worried about what Huawaii could be doing with their 5g technology when they already have that monster in the NSA… wow pot calling kettle black..

  49. Trebor Ironwolfe says:

    I just knew Angry Birds was a secret project of the Air Force…

  50. Nightshade Isis says:

    And while watching this I get an ad for brand new GPS tracking systems. Welp…

  51. Trebor Ironwolfe says:

    Reporter: "So, you have worked in a secret division of the NSA for over twenty years. Can you tell us a little about your daily routine?"
    Undisclosed: "Yes. Lots of masturbation to illegally obtained materials."
    Reporter: "Ok, thank you so much for your interview. Next up, find out how drones may be scanning your credit cards, in your wallet."

  52. Matt TheChosen says:

    Thumbs down for being a shill. Seriously it's way too soon to be shilling for that notoriously insecure security company.

  53. BlankBrain says:

    The spooks are much more terrifying than terrorists with weapons.

  54. Dead Parroting says:

    Snowden should be haled as a patriot, not a demon. The government invasion of privacy since 9/11 has been unprecedented and uncalled for. The NSA should be eliminated as a whole along with the CIA, the TSA, the DEA, and ICE. As a whole, there is no real reason for any of these agencies to exist.

  55. lunalicrichard says:

    Please stop promoting Nord VPN until they clean up their act! This also sends a bad message to the people who watch this channel.

  56. Dead Parroting says:

    Julian Assange should be a free man. There is no law saying that publishing true statements is a crime and can be punished. Where he got the truth has nothing to do with him. Whoever gave him the truth is subject to scrutiny. Who the truth was about should be the first priority, wouldn't you say?

  57. Justin Mabe says:

    0:41 thats what a reptilian would say

  58. Gavin Northey says:

    If you are still taking money from NordVPN, I would find it difficult to trust any of your sponsors.

  59. Michael Todd says:

    Simon you've made a video about internet security and secret surveillance and then actively promote a VPN that was hacked, had data taken and didn't tell anyone for over a year. Little ironic don't ya think

  60. Andrew Keener says:

    Since this is a video about security (in a way), I thought that you'd like to know that Nord recently suffered a data breach. I'll stick with my Norton VPN, thanks.

  61. sundhaug92 says:

    Optic Nerve is GCHQ, not NSA

  62. sundhaug92 says:

    The NSA logo you're using is the EFF parody, not the official agency logo

  63. sundhaug92 says:

    With SMSes, the NSA would have access to the content, not just metadata

  64. Accalia Murray Music says:

    Because this is an American agency, you can't ignore the likelihood that the NSA is selling their collected data to corporations, who use it for targeted advertising.

  65. Cynthia Bakke says:

    It's not paranoia if you're right.

  66. aoife aries says:

    nord vpn was cracked and hid it, don't use it

  67. TopTenz says:

    Official statement regarding recent news related to the sponsors, NordVPN – https://nordvpn.com/blog/official-response-datacenter-breach/

  68. Paul Barber says:

    10 Programs run by the NSA to spy on you…
    Sponsored by the latest major VPN to get HACKED!!!

    OH SIMON, I hope this is an ironic sponsorship.

  69. Hemi_red_13 says:

    Dale Gribble was right.

  70. Ano says:

    Let nord spy on you instead so they can sell your information

  71. John Doe says:

    We should just cut out the middle man, and call the NSA directly to personally tell them about our daily activities!

  72. compguy1121 says:

    Guess you are the only one shilling nord?

  73. 123Dunebuggy says:

    Nsa : we gather alot of information. Google : hold my beer.

  74. Corvo Fox-Gray says:

    Anyone who has a phone on the EE network should ask them about Project Blazer..

  75. JayeBird says:

    NORD SUCKS

  76. lorenzoo90 says:

    Y'all know Tor was made by the CIA & NAVY

  77. shubus says:

    I had stop stop watching when I found NordVPN was the sponsor.

  78. Polephemeus says:

    So the built-in ad was running a little longer than usual, so I skipped forward a few seconds, and then YouTube gave me an ad, this is ad-ception

  79. Dern Vader says:

    One server was affected in March 2018 in Finland. The rest of our service was not affected. No other servers of any type were put at risk. This was an attack on our server, not our entire service.
    The breach was made possible by poor configuration on a third-party datacenter’s part that we were never notified of. Evidence suggests that when the datacenter became aware of the intrusion, they deleted the accounts that had caused the vulnerabilities rather than notify us of their mistake.
    As soon as we learned of the breach, the server and our contract with
    the provider were terminated and we began an extensive audit of our
    service.
    No user credentials were affected.
    There are no signs that the intruder attempted to monitor user traffic in any way. Even if they had, they would not have had access to those users’ credentials.
    The attacker did acquire TLS keys
    that, under extraordinary circumstances, could be used to attack a
    single user on the web using a specifically targeted and highly
    sophisticated MITM attack that we detail further below. These keys could not and cannot be used to decrypt any encrypted NordVPN traffic in any form.
    Two other VPN providers were impacted in attacks published by the same intruder. We do not believe that this was a targeted attack against NordVPN.
    The incident effectively showed that the affected server did not contain any user activity logs. To prevent any similar incidents, among other means, we encrypt the hard disk of each new server we build. The security of our customers is the highest priority to us and we will continue to raise our standards further and further.

  80. Dern Vader says:

    One server was affected in March 2018 in Finland. The rest of our service was not affected. No other servers of any type were put at risk. This was an attack on our server, not our entire service.
    The breach was made possible by poor configuration on a third-party datacenter’s part that we were never notified of. Evidence suggests that when the datacenter became aware of the intrusion, they deleted the accounts that had caused the vulnerabilities rather than notify us of their mistake.
    As soon as we learned of the breach, the server and our contract with
    the provider were terminated and we began an extensive audit of our
    service.
    No user credentials were affected.
    There are no signs that the intruder attempted to monitor user traffic in any way. Even if they had, they would not have had access to those users’ credentials.
    The attacker did acquire TLS keys
    that, under extraordinary circumstances, could be used to attack a
    single user on the web using a specifically targeted and highly
    sophisticated MITM attack that we detail further below. These keys could not and cannot be used to decrypt any encrypted NordVPN traffic in any form.
    Two other VPN providers were impacted in attacks published by the same intruder. We do not believe that this was a targeted attack against NordVPN.
    The incident effectively showed that the affected server did not contain any user activity logs. To prevent any similar incidents, among other means, we encrypt the hard disk of each new server we build. The security of our customers is the highest priority to us and we will continue to raise our standards further and further.

  81. Heather Vasquez Vasquez says:

    I used to work at Bad Aibling Station, Germany where the pic of the domes was taken near end of video… 😮

  82. jeremy Mizer says:

    Nord vpn is owned by the NSA

  83. Jim Brewer says:

    Anybody here remember the NSA and DOJ/FBI's attempt to have the "clipper chip" installed on every PC markered and sold in the US? Fortunately that idea was shot down in flames.

  84. badgerbadger_badger Poppy? says:

    NordVPN acting like nothing just happened lmao

  85. Sam Morrow says:

    Nordvpn? Really???? I will stop watching at the point in ur video when you start shilling for nordvpn… Ur choice…. Dislike…

  86. 1701gijoe says:

    FISA court anyone?

  87. 1701gijoe says:

    Screw Snowden. Like Bergdhal, he had other means to disclose what he did rather than disclose everything to the other side. He could have gone to the UN, NATO, or even the Dalai Lama. But no, he had to go directly to Russia.

  88. no no says:

    I mean, I've known the government is watching everything I do for a while, I just dont care. Plus this video goes out to all the people who make fun of paranoids.

  89. jim kaljic says:

    No Such Agency — NSA.

  90. Razar Campbell says:

    I don't get what the big deal is. Why should I care if some agency off in america knows what porn I watch, or how often I use drugs, or what the results of my sociopathy test were? The using-our-own-cameras-to-watch-us bit is aggravating (no one needs to see the face I make when I poop), but why should anyone care about the rest of it?

  91. EzAzAbc ForeverKing says:

    Lame. I thought this was a video on nasa T_T

  92. Moises Montecillo says:

    Its DM's, IM's is the boomer way to say it

  93. Hollylivengood says:

    So how many of us who are older and rather, to be honest, frightening looking, now want to get naked in front of the web cam and swing our fat arses and bungee flopping boobs at a bunch of NSA workers jeeeust to teach them a lesson?

  94. bowblizz says:

    Simon is a member of the Watford 7. He was recruited from Princess Margaret polytechnic.

  95. rudolph mantooth banksy says:

    Quite terrifying. Simon, u stay here in the states?

  96. The Spook says:

    I have paid for Nord VPN but it doesn’t even work for me. As soon as I am connected it won’t let me do anything. There is no way to contact them from the app either. Now I hear that they have been hacked! I’m not happy with them.

  97. BluetoothSensei says:

    All your data are belong to us.

  98. Clint Maas says:

    A video about the NSA and hacking and sponsored by NordVPN? Isn't that ironic.

  99. Ron M says:

    Did it really take snowden for you to figure everything out? Every time there's a major event that involves tragic loss of life you see a politician demanding that we do something to prevent its recurrence. Result: every thing you touched upon in this vid. Snowdon breached trust and ran like a scared rabbit.

  100. 2015 Mercedes-Benz GLA 250 says:

    I'm imagining a bunch of NSA agents huddled around a computer watching someone pop off in COD halfway across the country.

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